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[update: printed here]

Oh man am I excited.

So I don’t usually post my 3D prints unless they come out pretty good, but I am super excited about this one. I just placed an order today!

Behold: Rakdos, Lord of Riots

Rakdos Figurine

This came about when I was testing out a new modelling tool, Sculptris, instead of my usual Maya and Max.

I love Sculptris! It’s a whole new way of modelling!

I had to rig my model after exporting it from Sculptris to pose it. As a side result, I can animate it.

I saw a really cool idea about having dice/spindown holders so I thought I’d turn the figurine into a spindown holder as well.

The dice goes into the triangle groove, with a face facing up. We’ll have to wait and see if it actually fits…nervous chuckle

positioning the dice

I ordered a figurine and a dice holder in polished red plastic, so here are some red renders while I wait:

red render

red render 2

I was bummed at the Dragon’s Maze Pre-Release. I’d hoped for some awesome spells to buff  my Selesnya deck, but atlas, the heart of the cards wasn’t with me.

Voice of Resurgence

To make myself feel better, I decided to make a Voice of Resurgence Token.

Behold:

Selesnya Token

This creature’s power and toughness are each equal to the number of creatures you control.

Selesnya

It’s my rendition of a promo creature token.

Token

Yup, I know I like tokens, so I made a token of a token.

[Edit: print poses and items!]

Pudge

Basics:

Faceless Void

I recently 3D printed a Faceless Void in color. It came out super nice. I have a mini-tutorial for 3D printing non-colored DOTA heroes, but someone asked me how to print the colored version.

Here you go!

  1. Like before, download your favorite Hero from Valve’s DOTA2 workshop. Heroes that would not be too good for printing are those with thin components (like, Death Prophet’s trailing scarf) or those with clear alpha-mapped areas (like, Naga Siren’s earlobes). Thin components are not printable, unless manually scaled up. The alpha-mapped areas will just print black. My Faceless Void actually has a bit of alpha-mapped areas on the bottom of his loin cloth, but I figured he’d be ok.

  2. I used Sculpteo to handle my 3D printing. Once I packaged my model, I handled to them, and a few weeks later, they shipped me a tiny Faceless Void. With Sculpteo, shipping is $6 when the order is over $50. They usually print super fast (almost 3-day turnaround) so my delay was probably a special case. My Faceless Void cost about $18, and measured 1.9 x 2.1 x 1.1 inches (price scales with size). There’s a slew of other services available, as well as the possibility of using an at-home 3D printer, but I really like Sculpteo.

Sculpteo model

  1. To get everything Sculpteo ready, the model needs to be packaged in a zip file. The model needs to be in an OBJ format, along with a MTL file, and the texture files. The OBJ will dictate the 3D shape of the model. It can be used by itself to print (like what I did with my Mini-Furion). The textures (Valve provides them as TGA files) will dictate the colors of the model. The MTL file will tell Sculpteo what parts are colored what.

files

  1. After downloading the Hero and unzipping the model files, there’ll be two folders. One is materialsrc, which will contain the materials. The other is models, which will contain the 3D models.
    Go into the materialsrc, and find _color TGA’s for each component. Copy those files to a new folder. These will be the color of the printed Hero.

all TGAs

  1. To get the OBJ and MTL files, open up 3ds Max 2013. If Valve provides an OBJ, it’s not really possible to use it since the MTL files produced will be incorrect (the texture mappings are wrong). Instead, find the fbx files in the models folder. Each fbx file will contain a component of the Hero.

  1. For each one of those fbx files, select the solid-looking mesh and export the selected as an OBJ. The wire structures are bones, used for animating the Hero, and can be ignored. Create a new scene after each export to clear the screen.

export mesh

  1. Once all the components are exported as an OBJ, import all of the OBJs into a single scene. They should be all positioned correctly to form the hero.

  2. Press M to texture the hero. Click on a white sphere, and click on the box next to Diffuse. This will bring up the Material/Map Browser. Clicking on Bitmap, and browse for one of the TGA textures. Drag and drop that texture on to the corresponding component to color the Hero. Hopefully all the mapping are correct and the Hero will look like it popped right out of DOTA2.

press M

Sometimes the mapping isn’t correct and it’s a pain to fix (like Faceless Void’s mace).

wrong colors

  1. Once everything is texture, select the components you want to print and export them as an OBJ. Make sure “Export materials” and “Create mat-library” is checked. Click the Map-Export button and it will tell you where the final MTL file will be created.

hurray

  1. Gather the final OBJ, the MTL, and the TGAs into a zip file and upload onto Sculpteo. Sculpteo is super nice in that it allows you to scale, and gives you a price quote. Be sure to check for solidity, which will tell you what areas are too thin / easy to break. When you’re ready, choose multicolor as the material, select your size, and add to cart.

shiny

Good luck!

Man, it’s been I while since I last posted.
I just haven’t had the time to doodle the happenings.

Today, I found a surprise package in the mail (love!).

Faceless not Maceless

Back when I made pants for peppermints, I decided try out the 3D-printing in full color. I had a wee bit of Sculpteo credits left, so I added a Faceless Void to the order. I totally forgot about him until today.

Faceless Void :D

Oh man is he sweet.

Details! :D

He stands a couple inches tall, fully colored, with super sharp details.

He’s so pretty! I’m really impressed by today’s 3D printing capabilities!

bringing sexy back

I think I’m going to give this figurine to Dan, one of my friends that I played DOTA with. Faceless Void is his favorite character.

I might post a tutorial if folks want to print their own. It’s not too different from printing a uncolored version, like my Mini-Furion.

[print your own hero here]

It’s Peppermint Butler time!

peppermint butler

I outfitted starlight mints into Peppermint Butlers (a character from Adventure Time) using 3D Studios Max and 3D printing technology.

Here’s how I modeled the pants:

The peppermint holder consists of three components: a front, a back, and an in-between.

For the back:

I first created a circle spline of radius 11, and then turned it into a hemi-circle spline by deleting the topmost point and connecting the remaining points. I then extruded the spline by 1 to create the back surface.

For the front:

Very similar to how I created the back, I used the same methods to create the front. I used Break to create additional points in the spline and connected them to form the V-neck.

For the in-between:

I cut a donut spline in half and extruded it by 11 to form the in-between slice.

work in progress

The arms and legs were just simple cylinders. The arm cylinders had a Bend modifier applied to them with angle 50.

With all my pieces positioned correctly, I attached them to a single mesh. At this point, there were overlapping vertices, which would cause problems in printing. To overcome this problem, I selected all of my points, welded them with the threshold 0.1.

With a complete model, I sent it off for printing. Shapeways and Sculpteo were two lovely services that handled all my 3D-printing needs.

standing butler

A little while later, my peppermints have pants!

My Foodsafe Peppermint Butler (large enough to hold the wrapper) measured 1.5 x 0.549 x 0.724 inches. My snuggier, Non-foodsafe Peppermint Butler measured 1.250 x 0.549 x 0.724 inches.

More pictures in my previous post.

Peppermint Butler

Once upon a time, I saw some starlight mints at a local CVS store.

“HOLY SMOKES THEY LOOK LIKE PEPPERMINT BUTLER,” I exclaimed.

From that day on, I decided to turn those mints into butlers, by 3D printing them some tiny pants.

The pants came in two sizes: foodsafe and non-foodsafe.

Foodsafe Peppermint Butler

Foodsafe Peppermint Butler

Non-foodsafe Peppermint Butler

Non-foodsafe Peppermint Butler

I painted faces on the Foodsafe Peppermint Butler.

The Non-foodsafe Peppermint Butler? Well, he’s a bit more naked…

getting dressed

getting dressed

Here’s some instructions to make your own.

I was ecstatic the day my friend gave me a DOTA2 beta invite. Having been a fan of the first DOTA (Defense of the Anicents) game, DOTA2 filled me with warm nostalgia.
DOTA

It also filled all my free time. For the past three months, (as semi-evident by my lack of posts and spiffy projects), I became entrenched in the world of the Radiant and the Dire, ganking enemies, buffing allies, causing general ruckus. I also met a lot of awesome people like one of my friend’s internet posse. We team up nightly for epic games.

When Valve brilliantly released their DOTA workshop, allowing user-made models to appear in-game, I was thrilled. I’d dabbled in 3D-modelling as a bright-eyed youngin’ and was super interested in building custom gear for some of my favorite heroes.

My first time in the workshop, I made an amazing discovery:

VALVE SUPPLIED THE HERO MODELS!!!

They kindly offered models of the DOTA heroes in convenient formats, which inspired me to 3D-print mini-figurines.

Behold my adorable mini-Furion (Valve calls him Nature’s Prophet):

Mini-Furion

Mini-Furion

He’s a cute 1.5 inches tall with all sorts of nifty details that my phone camera cannot capture.

Currently he stands guard at my desk with a mini-keychain Crystal Maiden (with a giant head hole for threading and everything!).

Crystal Maiden

Using Sculpteo to print, the total cost for printing (and shipping) was $15.20. Crystal Maiden came for free, thanks to their nice folks at giving away keychains.

How-To 3D-Print Your Own Mini DOTA2 Hero:

  1. Download a model from Valve’s DOTA2 Workshop. Picking a good hero to 3D print is tricky. A lot of heroes lose their personality when untextured. Also, a lot of heroes have tiny components which are too fragile to be printed.

  2. To 3D print using commercial services like Sculpteo, the model needs to be in an OBJ file (which comes with some heroes) or a STL file. Since all heroes come with a Maya file, Maya can be used to export the heroes into STL (only with newer version of Maya) or into OBJ (any recent version of Maya). Heroes can also pose, by moving the various skeletons. I made my Furion hold his staff.
    Maya

  3. After exporting into the appropriate formats, the model needs to be checked to see if it conforms to a manifold (Shapeways has a nice, simple article on manifolds pertaining to 3D printing), has holes, has inverted normals, and has other similar non-printability problems. A lot of commercial services will do that check automatically upon upload. So will netfabb Basic.

  4. I uploaded my Furion to Sculpteo, scaled it accordingly, and hit print, and 3 weeks later, VIOLA! Sculpteo offers a really nice check unprintable thin components and a real-time scaling for price adjustments.

[edit: tutorial for 3d printing in color]