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Tag Archives: DOTA2

[Edit: Full tutorial in MAKE: Vol 38!]

Video Game Plushies

Meet Max. He’s a Baby Roshan, from the video game DOTA2.

I algorithmically generated his sewing patterns from the 3D model, custom printed the fabric, and stitched him together.

How I made Max:

I started with this awesome 3D model of Baby Roshan. It is made up of approximately three things.

Model

The first is a set of 3D points, to define its shape.
3D points

The second is a set of 2D points (called UVs), to define how textures are applied to it.

UV

The third is the texture itself.

I took that model, and created a new set of UVs for it, such that whenever two sets of UVs joined, a seam will be created on my final plushie.

custom UV mapping

new UVs

Given that the two sets of UVs map to the same 3D model, transformation matrices can be calculated to transform the old texture into a new texture. Using scripts that I wrote, I transformed every face, and assembled the result. Here’s one of several pieces.

Piece 1

This new texture I printed into fabric and sewed together to create Max.

Rawr

Ta-da!

I hope this inspired you.

[Full technical/mathematical explanation of what I did here]

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disperse

I guess I should start DOTA Reactions back up again, since i’ve been playing oodles of DOTA.

For one game, I went Shadow Demon to counter Warlock. Every time Warlock summoned Golem, I purged it. When Warlock got Scepter, I got Diffusal Blade.

Pretty sweet.

Match Date: June 28th

[Edit: print poses and items!]

Pudge

 

Basics:

Faceless Void

I recently 3D printed a Faceless Void in color. It came out super nice. I have a mini-tutorial for 3D printing non-colored DOTA heroes, but someone asked me how to print the colored version.

Here you go!

  1. Like before, download your favorite Hero from Valve’s DOTA2 workshop. Heroes that would not be too good for printing are those with thin components (like, Death Prophet’s trailing scarf) or those with clear alpha-mapped areas (like, Naga Siren’s earlobes). Thin components are not printable, unless manually scaled up. The alpha-mapped areas will just print black. My Faceless Void actually has a bit of alpha-mapped areas on the bottom of his loin cloth, but I figured he’d be ok.

  2. I used Sculpteo to handle my 3D printing. Once I packaged my model, I handled to them, and a few weeks later, they shipped me a tiny Faceless Void. With Sculpteo, shipping is $6 when the order is over $50. They usually print super fast (almost 3-day turnaround) so my delay was probably a special case. My Faceless Void cost about $18, and measured 1.9 x 2.1 x 1.1 inches (price scales with size). There’s a slew of other services available, as well as the possibility of using an at-home 3D printer, but I really like Sculpteo.

Sculpteo model

  1. To get everything Sculpteo ready, the model needs to be packaged in a zip file. The model needs to be in an OBJ format, along with a MTL file, and the texture files. The OBJ will dictate the 3D shape of the model. It can be used by itself to print (like what I did with my Mini-Furion). The textures (Valve provides them as TGA files) will dictate the colors of the model. The MTL file will tell Sculpteo what parts are colored what.

files

  1. After downloading the Hero and unzipping the model files, there’ll be two folders. One is materialsrc, which will contain the materials. The other is models, which will contain the 3D models.
    Go into the materialsrc, and find _color TGA’s for each component. Copy those files to a new folder. These will be the color of the printed Hero.

all TGAs

  1. To get the OBJ and MTL files, open up 3ds Max 2013. If Valve provides an OBJ, it’s not really possible to use it since the MTL files produced will be incorrect (the texture mappings are wrong). Instead, find the fbx files in the models folder. Each fbx file will contain a component of the Hero.

  1. For each one of those fbx files, select the solid-looking mesh and export the selected as an OBJ. The wire structures are bones, used for animating the Hero, and can be ignored. Create a new scene after each export to clear the screen.

export mesh

  1. Once all the components are exported as an OBJ, import all of the OBJs into a single scene. They should be all positioned correctly to form the hero.

  2. Press M to texture the hero. Click on a white sphere, and click on the box next to Diffuse. This will bring up the Material/Map Browser. Clicking on Bitmap, and browse for one of the TGA textures. Drag and drop that texture on to the corresponding component to color the Hero. Hopefully all the mapping are correct and the Hero will look like it popped right out of DOTA2.

press M

Sometimes the mapping isn’t correct and it’s a pain to fix (like Faceless Void’s mace).

wrong colors

  1. Once everything is texture, select the components you want to print and export them as an OBJ. Make sure “Export materials” and “Create mat-library” is checked. Click the Map-Export button and it will tell you where the final MTL file will be created.

hurray

  1. Gather the final OBJ, the MTL, and the TGAs into a zip file and upload onto Sculpteo. Sculpteo is super nice in that it allows you to scale, and gives you a price quote. Be sure to check for solidity, which will tell you what areas are too thin / easy to break. When you’re ready, choose multicolor as the material, select your size, and add to cart.

shiny

Good luck!

Man, it’s been I while since I last posted.
I just haven’t had the time to doodle the happenings.

Today, I found a surprise package in the mail (love!).

Faceless not Maceless

Back when I made pants for peppermints, I decided try out the 3D-printing in full color. I had a wee bit of Sculpteo credits left, so I added a Faceless Void to the order. I totally forgot about him until today.

Faceless Void :D

Oh man is he sweet.

Details! :D

He stands a couple inches tall, fully colored, with super sharp details.

He’s so pretty! I’m really impressed by today’s 3D printing capabilities!

bringing sexy back

I think I’m going to give this figurine to Dan, one of my friends that I played DOTA with. Faceless Void is his favorite character.

I might post a tutorial if folks want to print their own. It’s not too different from printing a uncolored version, like my Mini-Furion.

[print your own hero here]