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[Edit: print poses and items!]

Pudge

Basics:

Faceless Void

I recently 3D printed a Faceless Void in color. It came out super nice. I have a mini-tutorial for 3D printing non-colored DOTA heroes, but someone asked me how to print the colored version.

Here you go!

  1. Like before, download your favorite Hero from Valve’s DOTA2 workshop. Heroes that would not be too good for printing are those with thin components (like, Death Prophet’s trailing scarf) or those with clear alpha-mapped areas (like, Naga Siren’s earlobes). Thin components are not printable, unless manually scaled up. The alpha-mapped areas will just print black. My Faceless Void actually has a bit of alpha-mapped areas on the bottom of his loin cloth, but I figured he’d be ok.

  2. I used Sculpteo to handle my 3D printing. Once I packaged my model, I handled to them, and a few weeks later, they shipped me a tiny Faceless Void. With Sculpteo, shipping is $6 when the order is over $50. They usually print super fast (almost 3-day turnaround) so my delay was probably a special case. My Faceless Void cost about $18, and measured 1.9 x 2.1 x 1.1 inches (price scales with size). There’s a slew of other services available, as well as the possibility of using an at-home 3D printer, but I really like Sculpteo.

Sculpteo model

  1. To get everything Sculpteo ready, the model needs to be packaged in a zip file. The model needs to be in an OBJ format, along with a MTL file, and the texture files. The OBJ will dictate the 3D shape of the model. It can be used by itself to print (like what I did with my Mini-Furion). The textures (Valve provides them as TGA files) will dictate the colors of the model. The MTL file will tell Sculpteo what parts are colored what.

files

  1. After downloading the Hero and unzipping the model files, there’ll be two folders. One is materialsrc, which will contain the materials. The other is models, which will contain the 3D models.
    Go into the materialsrc, and find _color TGA’s for each component. Copy those files to a new folder. These will be the color of the printed Hero.

all TGAs

  1. To get the OBJ and MTL files, open up 3ds Max 2013. If Valve provides an OBJ, it’s not really possible to use it since the MTL files produced will be incorrect (the texture mappings are wrong). Instead, find the fbx files in the models folder. Each fbx file will contain a component of the Hero.

  1. For each one of those fbx files, select the solid-looking mesh and export the selected as an OBJ. The wire structures are bones, used for animating the Hero, and can be ignored. Create a new scene after each export to clear the screen.

export mesh

  1. Once all the components are exported as an OBJ, import all of the OBJs into a single scene. They should be all positioned correctly to form the hero.

  2. Press M to texture the hero. Click on a white sphere, and click on the box next to Diffuse. This will bring up the Material/Map Browser. Clicking on Bitmap, and browse for one of the TGA textures. Drag and drop that texture on to the corresponding component to color the Hero. Hopefully all the mapping are correct and the Hero will look like it popped right out of DOTA2.

press M

Sometimes the mapping isn’t correct and it’s a pain to fix (like Faceless Void’s mace).

wrong colors

  1. Once everything is texture, select the components you want to print and export them as an OBJ. Make sure “Export materials” and “Create mat-library” is checked. Click the Map-Export button and it will tell you where the final MTL file will be created.

hurray

  1. Gather the final OBJ, the MTL, and the TGAs into a zip file and upload onto Sculpteo. Sculpteo is super nice in that it allows you to scale, and gives you a price quote. Be sure to check for solidity, which will tell you what areas are too thin / easy to break. When you’re ready, choose multicolor as the material, select your size, and add to cart.

shiny

Good luck!

It’s Peppermint Butler time!

peppermint butler

I outfitted starlight mints into Peppermint Butlers (a character from Adventure Time) using 3D Studios Max and 3D printing technology.

Here’s how I modeled the pants:

The peppermint holder consists of three components: a front, a back, and an in-between.

For the back:

I first created a circle spline of radius 11, and then turned it into a hemi-circle spline by deleting the topmost point and connecting the remaining points. I then extruded the spline by 1 to create the back surface.

For the front:

Very similar to how I created the back, I used the same methods to create the front. I used Break to create additional points in the spline and connected them to form the V-neck.

For the in-between:

I cut a donut spline in half and extruded it by 11 to form the in-between slice.

work in progress

The arms and legs were just simple cylinders. The arm cylinders had a Bend modifier applied to them with angle 50.

With all my pieces positioned correctly, I attached them to a single mesh. At this point, there were overlapping vertices, which would cause problems in printing. To overcome this problem, I selected all of my points, welded them with the threshold 0.1.

With a complete model, I sent it off for printing. Shapeways and Sculpteo were two lovely services that handled all my 3D-printing needs.

standing butler

A little while later, my peppermints have pants!

My Foodsafe Peppermint Butler (large enough to hold the wrapper) measured 1.5 x 0.549 x 0.724 inches. My snuggier, Non-foodsafe Peppermint Butler measured 1.250 x 0.549 x 0.724 inches.

More pictures in my previous post.

Peppermint Butler

Once upon a time, I saw some starlight mints at a local CVS store.

“HOLY SMOKES THEY LOOK LIKE PEPPERMINT BUTLER,” I exclaimed.

From that day on, I decided to turn those mints into butlers, by 3D printing them some tiny pants.

The pants came in two sizes: foodsafe and non-foodsafe.

Foodsafe Peppermint Butler

Foodsafe Peppermint Butler

Non-foodsafe Peppermint Butler

Non-foodsafe Peppermint Butler

I painted faces on the Foodsafe Peppermint Butler.

The Non-foodsafe Peppermint Butler? Well, he’s a bit more naked…

getting dressed

getting dressed

Here’s some instructions to make your own.

In regards to the McKittrick fabric, ablipintime wrote:

OH GOSH I got your thank you email and like, giggled madly since I bought that fabric in October! Or earlier I can’t remember…

I made bowties from it and lots of people got really excited over it the two times I’ve worn them to the hotel!

Either way it rocks, though I wish I had a variant with a smaller thistle pattern and some day I hope to have a vest made of it too but yeah totally going to buy more!

My day is made.

I was super excited by a recent email from Spoonflower, congratulating me that someone had bought my McKittrick fabric.

McKittrick fabric

It turned out that three people had actually bought it, over the course of many months, and I was just bad at filtering emails.

This fabric was originally designed for my Caroline dress. I wore it upon my second trip to Sleep No More, an incredible, immersive show that fueled my inner DIY-er. After my curtailed first trip (from which I already concluded Sleep No More was the best show ever), I decided to return for a second visit, and return in a grandiose manner. I sewed a dress, minted a coin, and created my own interaction with the actors. It was a really good time.

While I’ve stopped paying my patronage, I’m super excited that others are craftin’ away with the fabric. I hope to see some pictures of epic fan-creations, and perhaps the vicariousness will bring me back to the McKittrick once more.

Last Wednesday was surprise mail day!

A couple of weeks ago, I treated myself to something that had been on my wish list for a long time. Up until mail time, I had completely forgotten about the gift to myself.
I love you two-week-ago me!
note to self
My self-fulfilling surprise was a DIY Star Projector.
projector
The kit was super easy to assemble. Infmetry provided a nifty instruction video, so I didn’t even bother with the manuals.

Halfway through assembling, I plugged my lamp in for the first time. My heart palpitated as I pressed the ON switch. Little did I know know I had nothing to worry about. This kit was super well designed. A lot of pieces had nice grooves for a quick, error-proof build.
building
My friends and I huddled in a dark closet to test out the projections. It was absolutely gorgeous. We were enveloped by the evening sky.
starsstars closeup

It reminded me of a night in the Negev desert. Laying on the roof of a caravan, I watched the entire Milky Way twinkle as shooting stars slinged across of my field of vision. It was incredibly beautiful.
Negev with Sirrice
I have to say, for $22, this projector is a super worthwhile investment.
It’s dim amber light makes it perfect for a night-light.
From now on, I’ll be swimming in stars as I slip off to dreamland.
It will be heavenly.

A few people asked me how I made the fan-memorabilia coins for the amazing show Sleep No More.
coins!I followed this amazing tutorial.

Here’s some more technical details for those who want to attempt this.

The coins were 14-15 gauge, rimmed brass stamping blanks, and the etchant was copper etching solution (ferric chloride) from Dick Blick.

I made a total of seven coins, with the image on both sides, using the same etchant bath. Some of them came out significantly better than others.

all the coins
In the picture above, the coins are arranged from the least time in the bath to the longest time in the bath.

The first two coins were placed in the bath first, for 30 minutes. They resulted in a super faint design.
faint
Along with the first two coins, I had also etched a copper disk, for comparison.
copper
The copper disk didn’t have significant difference from the two brass ones.
However, I believe it did pollute the bath.

All successive coins I had a rust-colored coating, that may have been the result of the eroded copper in the bath.

The next two coin were left in the bath for 2 hours, and the remaining three were left in the bath for 3 hours. There were not much difference between them.

As for the rust-colored coating, it only happened on one side: the side that was facing down in the bath. As seen here, the two sides of the same coin came out drastically different.
heads

heads again!

Hope this helps some crafty folks out there!